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Negotiating the Script

  • Martin Harwit

Abstract

In late June 1994, Smithsonian under secretary Newman wrote to Herman Harrington and Hugh Dagley of the American Legion’s National Internal Affairs Commission to thank them for having met with us in May. She forwarded the latest version of the exhibition script we were just sending out to our advisory committee that day, and offered that we meet with the commission, anywhere, to discuss any aspect of the exhibition.1

Keywords

Nuclear Weapon Smithsonian Institution Atomic Bomb Press Conference American Legion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Constance B. Newman, letter to Herman G. Harrington, and an identical letter to Hubert R. Dagley II, June 21, 1994, NASM/MH. Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Harwit

There are no affiliations available

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