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Cerebral Laterality & Schizophrenia: A Review of the Interhemispheric Disconnection Hypothesis

  • John Gruzelier
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 130)

Abstract

The disorders of interhemispheric communication revealed by the animal experiments of Sperry & colleagues in the 1960’s (Sperry, 1964), and by the patients of Bogen & Vogel undergoing callosectomy (1962), gave impetus not only to basic research on hemispheric specialisation but also provided theoretical concepts of relevance to neurology and psychiatry (Geschwind, 1965; Galin, 1974). The splitting of psychic functions which gave schizophrenia its name was plausibly seen to stem from disconnection in neurological terms between a rational, verbally mediated left hemisphere and a holistic, nonverbally mediated right hemisphere. Conceivably, the observed dissociation between affect and cognition may have a similar origin to the dissociation between verbal and facial expression sometimes seen after callosectomy. Alternatively, a disorder of hemispheric specialisation which disrupted the normal processes of interhemispheric integration might be at fault; the popular presumption was that this was likely to be left-sided in view of the linguistic disturbances of schizophrenia. Acordingly, the split mind of the schizophrenic might arise from a split brain. Substance to these ideas was added by two influential reports. Flor-Henry (1969) surveyed the lateralisation of epileptic foci in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy combined with schizophrenia or manic-depressive features.

Keywords

Left Hemisphere Schizophrenic Patient Hemisphere Asymmetry Dichotic Listening Interhemispheric Transfer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Gruzelier
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryCharing Cross and Westminster Medical SchoolLondonUK

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