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Intentional Torts in Psychiatric Practice

  • Seymour L. Halleck
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

In the common law, wrongs which are inflicted intentionally are actionable. The element of intent is present when the wrongdoer is either motivated to harm another or realizes that a certain (usually harmful) result is substantially sure to follow from his actions. Some acts are both intentional torts and crimes and in these cases both civil tort action and criminal prosecution may be brought for the same wrongful conduct.

Keywords

Confidential Information Expert Testimony Medical Malpractice Undue Influence Psychiatric Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seymour L. Halleck
    • 1
  1. 1.University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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