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Motivation, Activation, and Behavioral Integration

  • David L. Wolgin

Abstract

The lateral hypothalamus has long been regarded as an important neural substrate for the expression of motivated behavior. Electrical or chemical stimulation of the hypothalamus can elicit a wide range of species-typical responses, including feeding, drinking, attack, and mating (see, e.g., Myers, 1974; Roberts, 1970). Conversely, ablation of the hypothalamus disrupts the natural counterparts of these elicited behaviors (Anand & Brobeck, 1951; Brookhart & Dey, 1941; Caggiula, Antelman, & Zigmond, 1973; Hitt, Hendricks, Ginsberg, & Lewis, 1970; Karli & Vergnes, 1964; Teitelbaum & Epstein, 1962; Teitelbaum & Stellar, 1954; Wolgin & Teitelbaum, 1978). Historically, these results have been attributed to the direct manipulation of hypothalamic circuits mediating specific motivational states (e.g., Hoebel, 1975; Roberts, 1969, 1970; Stellar, 1954). However, during the past decade three lines of evidence have suggested that circuits subserving relatively nonspecific functions are also importantly involved. First, Valenstein and his colleagues have shown that the hypothalamic circuits mediating feeding and drinking are more “plastic” than previously thought (Valenstein, Cox, & Kakolewski, 1970). For example, feeding elicited by electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus can be transformed to drinking simply by replacing the rat’s food with a drinking tube containing water (Valenstein, Cox, & Kakolewski, 1968).

Keywords

Physiological Psychology Reticular Formation Lateral Hypothalamus Paradoxical Sleep Experimental Neurology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Wolgin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyFlorida Atlantic UniversityBoca RatonUSA

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