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The Problem of Expression

  • Norman E. Spear
  • Robert L. Isaacson

Abstract

This book deals with a problem that has enormous significance for understanding behavior and is correspondingly broad in its scope. The problem is why at some times knowledge is readily available for adaptive application by an organism and yet at other times this same knowledge, whether in the form of learned relationships or the most elementary of species-specific motor patterns, is simply not expressed even though the individual’s welfare, or even its survival, might require it. To say this another way, what is known is not always represented faithfully by what is expressed. Or, given what we know, why do we not always do what we should do?

Keywords

Retention Interval Episodic Memory Semantic Memory Memory Retrieval Verbal Report 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman E. Spear
    • 1
  • Robert L. Isaacson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyState University of New York at BinghamtonBinghamtonUSA

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