Alpha and Gamma Phase Sintering of Carbonyl and Other Iron Powders

  • Arnold R. Poster
  • Henry H. Hausner

Abstract

It is well known that carbonyl iron powders behave differently during sintering in comparison to commercially available electrolytic and reduced iron powders. This investigation of the sintering of carbonyl and other iron powders in the alpha and gamma range of iron has shown that the rate of densification and the sintered density of carbonyl iron powder is considerably greater than that of the two other types of iron powder. This is also true with respect to the actual values of strength and elongation. The changes in grain structure of carbonyl iron powder during sintering up to 2000°F are shown. Attempts have been made to explain the sintering behavior of carbonyl iron powder by the difference in the correlation between surface and volume diffusion and also between grain boundary and volume diffusion, which correlation differs from those for the larger electrolytic and reduced iron powders.

Keywords

Porosity Furnace Corn Ferrite Austenite 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Libsch, J., R. Volterra, and John Wulff, “The Sintering of Iron Powder,” in: John Wulff (ed.), Powder Metallurgy, American Society for Metals, Novelty, Ohio.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Schlecht, L., W. Schubardt, and F. Duftschmid, “Sintering of Powdered Iron by Heat and Pressure Treatment,” Z. Elektrochem. 37: 485 (1931).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Forss, S. Lennart, “Raw Materials and Properties in Ferrous Powder Metallurgy,” ASM Technical Report No. 14.4.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Cizeron, G., “Influence of Grain Size on the Kinetics of Contraction of Agglomerates of Ex-Carbonyl Iron during Roasting in the Alpha Phase,” Compt. Rend. 245: 2051–2054 (1957).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cizeron, G., “Influence of Double Compaction on the Kinetics of Sintering of Agglomerates of Carbonyl Iron,” Compt. Rend. 246: 3060–3063 (1958).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Cizeron, G., and P. Lacombe, “A Dilatometric Study of the Isothermal Sintering of Carbonyl Iron Powder,” Compt. Rend. 240: 427–429 (1955).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Cizeron, G., and P. Lacombe, “Einfluss der Erhitzung von Presslingen aus carbonyleisen Pulver auf Temperaturen unter und ueber der A-3-Temperatur auf den Sinter-Vorgang,” Rev. Met. 53: 819–830 (1956).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Cizeron, G., and P. Lacombe, “Role of Grain Boundaries and the α → γ Allotropic Transformation of Iron in the Elimination of Pores During Sintering of Carbonyl Iron,” Compt. Rend. 241(4): 409–411(1955).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Cizeron, G., and P. Lacombe, “Influence of Self Diffusion Effects in Powder Metallurgy Above and Below the Transformation Point A-3 of Pure Iron, Made from Carbonyl,” Rev. Met. 52: 771–784 (1955) [English summary].Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Cizeron, G., and P. Lacombe, “Microscopic and X-Ray Examination of Shrinkage Caused by the Sintering Process,” Stahl Eisen 79: 1366–1370 (1959).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Fischmeister, H. F., “Densification and Grain Growth in the Later Stages of Sintering of Alpha Iron,” Jernkontoret Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy at the Swedish Institute for Metal Research, Stockholm Ö, Sweden. Private communication, 1965.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Jenkins, Ivor, “Some Aspects of Residual Porosity in Powder Metallurgy,” Powder Met. 7(13): 68–93 (1964).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Zapf, C., “The Pressing and Sintering Properties of Iron Powders,” Powder Met. 7: 218 (1961).Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Kuczynski, G. C., “Self-Diffusion in Sintering of Metallic Particles,” Trans. AIME 185: 169–178 (1949).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Cizeron, G., and P. Lacombe, “Microscopic and X-Ray Examination of Shrinkage Caused by the Sintering Process,” Stahl Eisen 79: 1366–1370 (1959).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arnold R. Poster
    • 1
  • Henry H. Hausner
    • 1
  1. 1.General Aniline and Film Corp.New YorkUSA

Personalised recommendations