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Peripheral Vascular Compliance

  • Dali J. Patel
  • Bernell R. Coleman
  • Russell J. Tearney
  • LaVal N. Cothran
  • Charles L. Curry
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 166)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to describe some recent advances in the field of vascular compliance with particular reference to a noninvasive method to compute distensibility of small blood vessels in man. Vascular compliance is defined in physiology as the ratio of a change in volume (∆V) for a given change in pressure (∆P) in any region of the vascular bed. Its value depends on the size of the vascular bed and the elastic properties of vascular wall. If the wall properties are of primary importance, then a correction is made in the compliance calculation for size and one calculates vascular distensibility, D, defined as
$$ D=100\left( \Delta V/V \right)/\left( \Delta P \right) $$
(1)
where V is the initial volume of the bed.

Keywords

Mean Arterial Pressure Hypertensive Subject Transmural Pressure Resistance Vessel Small Blood Vessel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dali J. Patel
    • 1
  • Bernell R. Coleman
    • 1
  • Russell J. Tearney
    • 1
  • LaVal N. Cothran
    • 1
  • Charles L. Curry
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and Biophysics and Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, College of MedicineHoward UniversityUSA

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