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Cytogenetic Aspects of Werner Syndrome

  • Darrell Salk
  • Kam Au
  • Holger Hoehn
  • George M. Martin
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 190)

Abstract

Cultured skin fibroblast-like (FL) cells from patients with Werner syndrome display frequent pseudodiploidy involving multiple, variable structural chromosome rearrangements that are clonal (Salk et al., 1981a). This cytogenetic abnormality, which has been called variegated translocation mosaicism (VTM), has also recently been observed in peripheral blood lymphocytes (Scappaticci et al., 1982). Werner syndrome may properly be classified as a chromosome instability syndrome because, like Bloom syndrome, ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi anemia, and xeroderma pigmentosum, it is autosomal recessive, displays chromosome instability, and is associated with an increased incidence of neoplasia.

Keywords

Fanconi Anemia Mass Culture Xeroderma Pigmentosum Ataxia Telangiectasia Werner Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Darrell Salk
    • 1
  • Kam Au
    • 1
  • Holger Hoehn
    • 2
  • George M. Martin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of WashingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Human GeneticsUniversity of WuerzburgGermany

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