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Neuronal and Glial Cell Cultures, a Tool for Investigation of Ganglioside Function

  • P. Mandel
  • H. Dreyfus
  • A. N. K. Yusufi
  • L. Sarliève
  • J. Robert
  • N. Neskovic
  • S. Harth
  • G. Rebel
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 125)

Abstract

Gangliosides are membrane constituents that are partly embedded in the bilayer structure of the membrane and partly exposed to the external environment by negative-charged polysaccharide chains. One may expect that they are involved in structural plasticity and in the functional activity of the plasma membrane. Great interest has been devoted to ganglioside structure and function during cell differentiation, maturation and ageing (see for review HAKOMORI, 1973). Changes associated with cell transformation, reduction of the levels of the most complex sphingolipids, a decrease in the activity of glycosyl- and/or sialyltransferases have raised the question of involvement of gangliosides in contact inhibition (HAKOMORI, 1973). Binding properties of gangliosides to exotoxins of Vibrio cholerae and Clostridium tetani drew attention to a function of sialoglycolipids as cell surface receptors and to their interactions with proteins and glycoproteins localized on cell surfaces or close to cell surfaces (SHAROM and GRANT, 1978; YAKAMAWA and NAGAI, 1978). Finally, an increasing interest in gangliosides of the nervous system arose when alterations of gangliosides in some genetic diseases was discovered (for review see SUZUKI, 1976) and when the abundance of gangliosides in plasma and synaptic membrane was established (MORGAN et al., 1971; LEDEEN, 1978). Moreover, attention became focused on the role of gangliosides in cation binding, transport and release (ABRAMSON, YU and ZABY, 1972; BEHR and LEHN, 1973; HAYASHI and KATAGIRI, 1974) and in neurotransmission (SVENNERHOLM, this book).

Keywords

Glial Cell Guanylate Cyclase Glial Cell Culture Sialyltransferase Activity Ganglioside Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Mandel
    • 1
  • H. Dreyfus
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. N. K. Yusufi
    • 1
  • L. Sarliève
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. Robert
    • 1
  • N. Neskovic
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Harth
    • 1
    • 3
  • G. Rebel
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre de Neurochimie du CNRS, and Unité 44 de l’INSERMStrasbourg CedexFrance
  2. 2.Chargés de Recherche à l’INSERMFrance
  3. 3.Chargés de Recherche au CNRSFrance

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