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“Neuraminidase-Resistant” Sialic Acid Residues of Gangliosides

  • Roland Schauer
  • Rüdiger W. Veh
  • M. Sander
  • Anthony P. Corfield
  • Herbert Wiegandt
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 125)

Abstract

Gangliosides have been found to contain up to five sialic acid moieties bound to galactose residues in α, 2->3 linkages either at the end of the oligosaccharide chain or within the chain, and may form di- and trisialyl groups with α,2->8 linkages (1,2). N-Acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuG1) have been identified as the commonly occurring sialic acids in gangliosides, while the O-acetylated sialic acids occur less frequently. The 9-O-acetyl-N-acetylneuraminic acid has been found in gangliosides from a variety of vertebrates including man (3), and 4-O-acetyl-N-glycolylneuraminic acid (4-OAc-NeuGl) has been isolated from horse erythrocyte hematoside (4).

Keywords

Critical Micelle Concentration Sialic Acid Newcastle Disease Virus Clostridium Perfringens Sialic Acid Residue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roland Schauer
    • 1
  • Rüdiger W. Veh
    • 2
  • M. Sander
    • 2
  • Anthony P. Corfield
    • 1
  • Herbert Wiegandt
    • 3
  1. 1.Biochemisches InstitutUniversität KielGermany
  2. 2.Institut für AnatomieUniversität BochumGermany
  3. 3.Institut für Physiol. ChemieUniversität MarburgGermany

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