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Sialyltransferase Activities in Two Neuronal Models : Retina and Cultures of Isolated Neurons

  • H. Dreyfus
  • S. Harth
  • A. N. K. Yusufi
  • P. F. Urban
  • P. Mandel
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 125)

Abstract

Gangliosides have been found in various organs and tissues, however they are localized in a rather high amount and with a great diversity in the central nervous system (see for review LEDEEN and YU, 1976). The synthesis of gangliosides occurs by different pathways, requiring glycosyltransferases and sialyltransferases. Activities of these enzymes were studied both in non-nervous and in nervous tissues, with respect to their subcellular localization and kinetic properties. It was postulated that sialic acid residues on cell surfaces are involved in membrane-related cellular phenomena such as cellular recognition and adhesion, malignant transformation, contact inhibition and cellular migration (see for review SCHAUER, 1973). Further sialosyl groups seem to be involved in the receptor function of gangliosides (YAMAKAWA and NAGAI, 1978). Moreover, it was hypothesized that the formation of an enzyme-substrate complex between a glycosyltransferase from one cell and one acceptor from another could be responsible for cellular recognition (ROSEMAN, 1970).

Keywords

Neuronal Model Exogenous Substrate Sialic Acid Residue Endogenous Activity Chick Retina 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Dreyfus
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Harth
    • 1
    • 3
  • A. N. K. Yusufi
    • 1
  • P. F. Urban
    • 1
    • 3
  • P. Mandel
    • 1
  1. 1.Unité 44 de l’INSERM, and Centre de Neurochimie du CNRSStrasbourg CedexFrance
  2. 2.Chargé de Recherche à l’INSERMFrance
  3. 3.Chargés de Recherche au CNRSFrance

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