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Nucleate Boiling of Helium I in Channels Simulating the Cooling Channels of Large Superconducting Magnets

  • C. Johannes
  • J. Mollard
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 17)

Abstract

Most of the large superconducting magnets in the world today depend on the cooling provided by nucleate boiling of helium I for their stable operation. The helium flows by thermosiphon action through narrow cooling channels in these magnets. Although many experiments have been reported in the literature on the boiling of helium on surfaces in an open bath (pool boiling) the problem of nucleate boiling of helium I in channels simulating the cooling channels of large superconducting magnets has received relatively little attention. Studies on the peak nucleate boiling flux (PNBF) of helium in rectangular channels have been reported by Sydoriak and Roberts [1] and Wilson [2]. Studies on tubes, annuli, and rectangular channels have been reported by Lehongre et al. [3].The effect of cooling channel spacing on the performance of small superconducting magnets was investigated by Whetstone and Boom [4], Wilson [5], and Purdy et al. [6].A recent study reported by Kugler and Crossley [7] has been performed on a test section simulating part of the big European bubble chamber (BEBC) magnet of the CERN (Geneva).

Keywords

Heat Flux Heat Transfer Coefficient Nusselt Number Test Section Copper Plate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Johannes
    • 1
  • J. Mollard
    • 1
  1. 1.L’Air LiquideCentre d’Etudes CryogeniquesSassenageFrance

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