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Methods for a Life-Span Developmental Approach to Women in the Middle Years

  • Margie E. Lachman
Part of the Women in Context: Development and Stresses book series (WICO)

Abstract

The central thesis of this chapter1 is that the study of women in midlife can be enriched if it is placed in a change-oriented, life-span framework. This message is conveyed by the title of this book—Women in Midlife—which places middle age in the context of the life span. The book’s title also conveys a message about the current state of the field of life-span human development. Until recently, researchers have focused primarily on the young and the old. Thus, there is a gap in our knowledge about the middle of the life-span. This neglect of the middle years is particularly true with regard to the study of women, but the situation is slowly being rectified (see Baruch, Barnett, and Rivers, 1983; Eichorn, Clausen, Haan, Honzik, and Mussen, 1981; Giele, 1982; Lowenthal, Thurnher, and Chiriboga, 1975; Rossi, 1980; Rubin, 1979; Stewart and Platt, 1982; as well as this volume).

Keywords

Life Satisfaction Sequential Design Developmental Research Stability Coefficient Cohort Difference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Margie E. Lachman
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentBrandeis UniversityWalthamUSA

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