Environmentally Assisted Failures in Ordnance Components

  • P. A. Thornton
  • V. J. Colangelo
Part of the Sagamore Army Materials Research Conference Proceedings book series (SAMC, volume 24)

Abstract

The production of ordnance equipment in common with private industry utilizes a wide variety of manufacturing processes including: forging, heat treatment, electroplating, welding, machining, etc. Each of these processes has the propensity to cause material problems which may lead to premature failure. The failure analyst must, therefore, be familiar with the processing history of a component as well as details of a failure incident and the service environment.

To demonstrate the interaction between failure analyses and detrimental environments, both in manufacturing and in service, we have restricted this chapter to a few examples involving environmentally associated failures. Case histories are presented dealing with the following type failures in steel: liquid metal embrittlement, hydrogen embrittlement, pitting corrosion and stress corrosion, which have occurred in weapon components. These cases are reviewed in some detail to convey the techniques utilized in arriving at the reason(s) for failure. Implementation of the recommendations subsequent to an analysis, demonstrates how failures, although unfortunate, can serve to improve a product and refine a design or process.

Keywords

Zinc Nickel Toxicity Sulphide Welding 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. A. Thornton
    • 1
  • V. J. Colangelo
    • 1
  1. 1.Watervliet ArsenalWatervlietUSA

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