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Proteins, Lipids and Nucleic Acids

  • Leslie H. Chappell
Part of the Tertiary Level Biology book series (TLB)

Abstract

Although a detailed account of the biochemistry of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids is outside the scope of this book, it is nevertheless considered essential that the student of parasitology should be aware of the general direction of much of modern research into parasite organisation at the macromolecular level. What must also be made clear is that the biochemistry of these fundamental macromolecules is poorly understood when we compare the information available for parasites with that for bacteria and mammals.

Keywords

Helminth Parasite Salvage Pathway Ascaris Lumbricoides Plasmodium Knowlesi Parasite Tissue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Borst, P. and Fairlamb, A. H. (1976) “DNA of parasites, with special reference to kinetoplast DNA,” in Biochemistry of Parasites and Host-Parasite Relations, editor H. Van den Bossche. North Holland Publishing Co., 169–192.Google Scholar
  2. Dewey, V. C. (1967) “Lipid composition, nutrition and metabolism”, in Chemical Zoology, I: Protozoa, editor G. W. Kidder. Academic Press, 162–274.Google Scholar
  3. Gutteridge, W. E. and Coombs, G. H. (1977) Biochemistry of Parasitic Protozoa,Macmillan Press.Google Scholar
  4. Kidder, G. W. (1967) “ Nitrogen: distribution, nutrition and metabolism”, in Chemical Zoology, I: Protozoa, editor G. W. Kidder. Academic Press, 93–161.Google Scholar
  5. Lee, D. L. and Smith, M. H. (1965) “Haemoglobins of parasitic animals.” Experimental Parasitology, 16, 394–424.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Mandel, M. (1967) “Nucleic acids of Protozoa”, in Chemical Zoology, I: Protozoa, editor G. W. Kidder. Academic Press, 541–573.Google Scholar
  7. Meyer, F. and Meyer, H. (1972) “Loss of fatty acid biosynthesis in flatworms”, in Comparative Biochemistry of Parasites, editor H. Van den Bossche, Academic Press, 383–393.Google Scholar
  8. Newton, B. A. (1973) “Trypanocides as biochemical probes”, in Chemotherapeutic Agents in the Study of Parasites, Symposia of the British Society for Parasitology, 11, editors A. E. R. Taylor and R. Muller, 29–51.Google Scholar
  9. Newton, B. A. and Burnett, J. K. (1972) “DNA of Kinetoplastidae: a comparative study”, in Comparative Biochemistry of Parasites, editor H. Van den Bossche, Academic Press, 185–198.Google Scholar
  10. Newton, B. A., Cross, G. A. M. and Baker, J. R. (1973) “Differentiation in the Trypanosomatidae”, in Microbial Differentiation, Symposia of the Society for General Microbiology, 23, 339–373.Google Scholar
  11. Read, C. P. (1968) “Intermediary metabolism of flatworms. in Chemical Zoology, II: Porifera, Coelenterata and Platyhelminths, editors M. Florkin and B. Scheer, Academic Press, 328–357.Google Scholar
  12. Von Brand, T. (1973) Biochemistry of Parasites,2nd edition, Academic Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© L. H. Chappell 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leslie H. Chappell
    • 1
  1. 1.University of AberdeenUK

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