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Feeding and Nutritional Physiology

  • Leslie H. Chappell
Part of the Tertiary Level Biology book series (TLB)

Abstract

the ecologist, charles elton, once remarked that parasites live off their capital whereas predators live off their interest—thus suggesting that parasites maintain themselves at the expense of their hosts. In reality, there are very few examples where this conclusion is borne out by experimental observation. Parasites, in general, do not eat themselves out of a home.

Keywords

Amino Acid Transport Ventral Sucker Neutral Amino Acid Alimentary Canal Oral Sucker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Bennet-Clark, H. C. (1976) “Mechanics of nematode feeding”, in The Organisation of Nematodes, editor N. A. Croll, Academic Press, 313–342.Google Scholar
  2. Clegg, J A. and Smyth, J. D. (1968) “Growth, development and culture methods: parasitic platyhelminths”, in Chemical Zoology II. Porifera, Coelenterata and Platyhelminthes,editors M. Florkin and B. T. Scheer, Academic Press, 395–466.Google Scholar
  3. Conner, R. L. (1967) “Transport phenomena in Protozoa”, in Chemical Zoology I. Protozoa, editor G. W. Kidder, Academic Press, 309–350.Google Scholar
  4. Dewey, V. C. (1967) “Lipid composition, nutrition and metabolism”, in Chemical Zoology I. Protozoa, editor G. W. Kidder, Academic Press, 93–161.Google Scholar
  5. Erasmus, D. A. (1977) “The host-parasite interface of Trematoda.” Advances in Parasitology, 15, 201–243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Hockley, D. A. (1973) “Ultrastructure of the tegument of Schistosoma” Advances in Parasitology, 11, 233–305.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Jennings, J. B. (1968) “Nutrition and digestion”, in Chemical Zoology II. Porifera, Coelenterata and Platyhelminthes, editors M. Florkin and B. T. Scheer, Academic Press, 305–327.Google Scholar
  8. Kidder, G. W. (1967) “Nitrogen: distribution, nutrition and metabolism”, in Chemical Zoology I. Protozoa, editor G. W. Kidder, Academic Press, 93–161.Google Scholar
  9. Lee, D. L. (1972) “The structure of the helminth cuticle.” Advances in Parasitology, 10, 347–379.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Mettrick, D. F. and Podesta, R. B. (1974) “Ecological and physiological aspects of. helminth-host interactions in the mammalian gastrointestinal canal.” Advances in Parasitology, 12, 183–279.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Pappas, P. W. and Read, C. P. (1975) “Membrane transport in helminth parasites: a review.” Experimental Parasitology, 37, 469–530.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Read, C. P. (1971) “The microcosm of intestinal helminths”, in Ecology and Physiology of Parasites, editor A. M. Fallis, Adam Hilger Ltd., 188–200.Google Scholar
  13. Read, C. P., Rothman, A. H. and Simmons, J. E. (1963) “Studies on membrane transport, with special reference to parasite-host integration.” Annals of the New York Academy of Science, 113, 154–205.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Smyth, J. D. (1977) Introduction to Animal Parasitology,2nd edition, Hodder and Stoughton.Google Scholar
  15. Taylor, A. E. R. and Baker, J. R. (1968) The Cultivation of Parasites in vitro Blackwell. Von Brand, T. (1973) Biochemistry of Parasites,2nd edition, Academic Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© L. H. Chappell 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leslie H. Chappell
    • 1
  1. 1.University of AberdeenUK

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