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The Engulfing Potential of Peritoneal Phagocytes of Conventional and Germfree Mice

  • E. H. Perkins
  • P. Nettesheim
  • T. Morita
  • H. E. WalburgJr.
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1)

Abstract

It is not known what role naturally occurring microbial flora play in the development of the phagocytic capacity of peritoneal phagocytes. A quantitative comparative study of phagocytes from conventional and germfree animals is therefore desirable. With the development of a simple quantitative method, we have been able to measure the in vitro engulfing potential of peritoneal cells from different strains of mice raised in conventional or germfree environments. In the work to be presented we found no difference in the engulfing potential of peritoneal phagocytes from conventional and germfree mice. The importance of a defined population of cells and quantitative techniques are stressed, and the in vitro functional maturation of peritoneal phagocytes is reported.

Keywords

Mononuclear Phagocyte Peritoneal Cell Peritoneal Exudate Cell Phagocytic Capacity Germfree Mouse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. H. Perkins
    • 1
  • P. Nettesheim
    • 1
  • T. Morita
    • 1
  • H. E. WalburgJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Biology DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

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