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Spectrophotometric Investigation of Pulsatile Blood Flow for Transcutaneous Reflectance Oximetry

  • Yitzhak Mendelson
  • Peter W. Cheung
  • Michael R. Neuman
  • David G. Fleming
  • Stephan D. Cahn
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 159)

Abstract

Hemoglobin oxygen saturation (OS) is defined as the ratio of the concentration of oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) to the total hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in the blood. Continuous, rapid, accurate and noninvasive monitoring of OS is important physiologically and clinically in the evaluation of total oxygen availability to vital organs. The principal technique in present clinical use to measure OS involves taking a blood sample and analysing it usually with an optical transmission oximeter. This method is based on the different absorption spectra between oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin, as shown in Figure 1. While this technique is adequate for many clinical situations, it has the major limitation that measurements are made on discrete blood samples and thus continuous monitoring of OS cannot be achieved.

Keywords

Oxygen Saturation Oxygen Saturation Arterial Oxygen Saturation Optical Transducer Spectrophotometric Investigation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yitzhak Mendelson
    • 1
  • Peter W. Cheung
    • 1
  • Michael R. Neuman
    • 1
  • David G. Fleming
    • 1
  • Stephan D. Cahn
    • 1
  1. 1.Biomedical Engineering DepartmentCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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