Advertisement

Estimation of the Rate of CO2 Diffusion Into the Red Cell Through the Bohr Shift

  • M. Mochizuki
  • H. Takiwaki
  • T. Kagawa
  • K. Niizeki
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 159)

Abstract

When the reactions of the red blood cell with O2 and CO2 are observed in a reaction chamber of a micro-photometric apparatus, the plasma layer around the cell tends to be superfluously thick and usually becomes highly resistive to the O2 and CO2 diffusions. Nevertheless, since the diffusivity of CO2 through aqueous solution, in general, is about 20 times as high as that of O2, the rates of the Bohr-on- and off-shifts have been thought to be almost the same as those of the oxygenation and deoxygenation. In our observation, however, the Bohr-on-shift was constantly slower than the oxygenation, while the Bohr-off-shift was comparable with the deoxygenation rate. The half-time of the Bohr-on-shift was about 60% longer than that of the oxygenation. This fact suggested that the diffusion rates of CO2 and/or HCO3 ions were comparable with that of O2 and they could even be evaluated quantitatively by comparing the Bohr-shifts with the oxygenation and deoxygenation rates. Thus, in the present study the estimation of the CO2 diffusion rate into and out of the red cell was attempted from the measured rates of the simple O2 reactions and the Bohr shift.

Keywords

Diffusion Equation Dissociation Curve Haldane Effect Deoxygenation Rate Deoxygenation Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Douglas, J. Jr., and Rachford, H. H. Jr. On the numerical solution of the heat conduction problems in two and three space variables. Trans. Am. Math. Soc., 82, 421–439, 1956.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Nbchizuki, M., Tazawa, H., and Ono, T. Microphotanetry for determining the reaction rate of 02 and CO with the red cells in the chorioallantoic capillary. In: Oxygen Transport to Tissue. Eds. Bicher, H. I., and Bruley, D. F., Plenum, N.Y., 1973, pp. 997–1006.Google Scholar
  3. Mochizuki, M., and Tazawa, H. Measurement of oxygenation and deoxygenation of a single red cell of chicken embryo by means of a microphotaneter. In: Oxygen Transport to Tissue, Eds. Grote, J., Reneau, D., and Thews, G., Plenum, N.Y., 1975, pp. 121–130.Google Scholar
  4. Thews, G., and Niesel, W. Zur Theorie der Sauerstoffdiffusion in Erythrocyten. Pflügers Arch. 268, 318–333, 1959.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Uchida, K., Niizeki, K., and Mochizuki, M. pH measurements by means of a fluorescence technique and its application to studies on CO2 hydration reactions. J. Physiol Soc. Japan, 43, 413, 1981.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Mochizuki
    • 1
  • H. Takiwaki
    • 1
  • T. Kagawa
    • 1
  • K. Niizeki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyYamagata University School of MedicineYamagataJapan

Personalised recommendations