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Maternal and Fetal Tissue PO2 in the Pregnant Ewe Measured with Galvanic PO2 Electrodes

  • M. E. Towell
  • I. Regier
  • I. Lysak
  • D. Sayler
  • S. P. Bessman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 159)

Abstract

A galvanic PO2 electrode is the basis of a glucose sensor designed by Bessman and Schultz (1) for the artificial pancreas. We have used this electrode as a direct PO2 sensor and have previously recorded our experience with implantation of electrodes in the rabbit for periods of seven to twenty-one days to determine tissue PO2 in the undisturbed state (2), and during the administration of epinephrine (3).

Keywords

Fetal Tissue Fetal Heart Rate Uterine Contraction Uterine Wall Benzalkonium Chloride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. E. Towell
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • I. Regier
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • I. Lysak
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • D. Sayler
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • S. P. Bessman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of Obstetrics and GynecologyMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  2. 2.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.Department of Pharmacology and NutritionUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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