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Cerebrovascular Responses to Oxygen During Barbiturate Anesthesia

  • Tadashi Shinozuka
  • Edwin M. Nemoto
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 159)

Abstract

In a previous study we reported that increases in local cerebral blood flow (1CBF) during progressive reduction of PaO2 from 300 to 40 torr was casually related to an increase in cortical hydrogen ion concentration (H+)t (Shinozuka and Nemota, this Symposium). Brain tissue PO2 (PtO2) was also linearly related to (H+)t suggesting that a fall in PtO2 caused an increase in (H+)t which affected 1CBF.

Keywords

Parietal Cortex Pyridine Nucleotide Pentobarbital Anesthesia Local Cerebral Blood Flow Hydrogen Clearance 
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References

  1. 1.
    Erdmann, W. and Kunke, S. Changes of oxygen supply to the tissue following intravenous application of anesthetic drugs. In Oxygen Transport to Tissue, edited by Haim I. Bicher and Duane F. Bruley, Plenum Publishing Corporation, New York, 1973, pp 261–269.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kety, S. S. Regional circulation of the brain under physiological conditions-possible relationship to selective vulnerability. In Selective Vulnerability of the Brain in Hypoxaemia, edited by J. P. Schade and W. H. McMenemey, Philadelphia, F. A. Davis Company, 1963, pp 21–26.Google Scholar
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    Nilsson, L. And Siesjo, B. K. The effect of anesthetics upon labile phosphates and upon extra-and intracellular lactate, pyruvate and bicarbonate concentrations in the rat brain. Acta Physiol. Scand. 80: 235–248, 1970.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tadashi Shinozuka
    • 1
  • Edwin M. Nemoto
    • 1
  1. 1.The Anesthesia and CCM Research Laboratoires, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care MedicineUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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