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Thermomechanics for Electronics Packaging

  • John H. Lau

Abstract

With very few exceptions (for example, Invar, an iron-nickel alloy), substances expand when their temperature is raised and contract when cooled. The deformation (expansion or contraction) due to temperature change in the absence of mechanical loads is called thermal strain. The thermal strain is not exactly linear with temperature change (for example, see Chapter 5), but for first-order approximation and small temperature changes, this strain can be described as proportional to the temperature change. This proportionality is expressed by the coefficient of linear thermal expansion, which is defined as the change in length that a bar of unit length undergoes when its temperature is changed by one degree.

Keywords

Solder Joint Principal Stress Creep Rate Yield Surface Creep Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1993

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  • John H. Lau

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