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Effects of Phosphorus Depletion on Left Ventricular Energy Generation

  • Thomas J. Fuller
  • Wilmer W. Nichols
  • Bruce J. Brenner
  • John C. Peterson
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 103)

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that phosphorus depletion has an adverse effect on skeletal muscle function and composition. Specifically, a symptom complex characterized by muscle stiffness, weakness and severe pain has been described in patients taking aluminum hydroxide containing antacids (1,2). These complaints were especially notable when serum phosphorus concentrations approached or fell below 1 mg/100 ml and improved rapidly with correction of the hypophosphotemia. In addition, phosphorus depletion in experimental animals is characterized by a low resting transmembrane electrical potential difference as well as changes in skeletal muscle composition consistent with a “sick” cell (3).

Keywords

Stroke Work Aortic Blood Flow Serum Phosphorus Concentration Aluminum Carbonate Phosphorus Depletion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. Fuller
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wilmer W. Nichols
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bruce J. Brenner
    • 1
    • 2
  • John C. Peterson
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MedicineVeterans Administration HospitalGainesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineUniversity of Florida Medical SchoolGainesvilleUSA

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