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The Effects of Phosphate Depletion on Bone

  • Joel L. Ivey
  • Emily R. Morey
  • David J. Baylink
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 103)

Abstract

The importance of phosphate in the metabolism of an organism has been indicated by many of the other papers in this volume. Since phosphate is a major constituent of the mineralized phase of bone, this tissue can function as a reservoir for maintaining the extracellular fluid phosphate concentration during a period of phosphate depletion. In young, growing animals phosphate depletion results in decreased growth in general and decreased length of the long bones (1). Several workers have also shown that phosphate depletion results in an increased resorption of bone (1–3).

Keywords

Bone Resorption Serum Phosphate Resorptive Activity Osteoclast Number Total Serum Calcium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Baylink, D., Wergedal, J., and Stauffer, M.: Formation, mineralization, and resorption of bone in hypophosphatemic rats. J. Clin. Invest. 50: 2519, 1971.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joel L. Ivey
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Emily R. Morey
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • David J. Baylink
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.American Lake Veterans Administration HospitalTacomaUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  3. 3.NASA-Ames Research CenterMoffett FieldUSA

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