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Inadequate Bone Response to Phosphate and Vitamin D in Familial Hypophosphatemic Rickets (FHR)

  • F. H. Glorieux
  • P. J. Bordier
  • P. Marie
  • E. E. Delvin
  •  R. Travers
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 103)

Abstract

With the almost complete disappearance of vitamin D deficiency in the North-American continent, most cases of rickets now encountered on the pediatric wards may be attributed to one of the several states of vitamin D resistance. The most common of them is familial hypophosphatemic rickets (FHR) a condition usually transmitted as a sex-linked dominant trait. It is characterized by a hypophosphatemia present at birth, bone changes resembling vitamin D deficiency rickets and growth retardation. Bony deformities of the lower limbs are frequent but myopathy is strikingly absent (1).

Keywords

Phosphate Salt Normal Serum Calcium Resorption Surface Osteoid Surface Osteoblastic Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. H. Glorieux
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. J. Bordier
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Marie
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. E. Delvin
    • 1
    • 2
  •  R. Travers
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Genetics Unit, Shriners HospitalMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Unité de Recherche André LichtwitzINSERM, Hôpital LariboisièreParisFrance

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