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Interpretation of Cylindrical Langmuir Probe Signals from Streaming Laser-Produced Plasmas

  • Stephen B. Segall
Conference paper

Abstract

Experimental procedures for the use of cylindrical Langmuir probes to diagnose streaming laser-produced plasmas are described, and the steps involved in the development of a theory for the probe in a high velocity flowing plasma are summarized. The probe-plasma interaction for the front half of the probe facing the plasma flow is simulated using a stationary plasma model. Qualitative conclusions obtained from this analysis are then used to derive expressions for current collected in the flowing plasma case. Theoretical electron current characteristics are calculated and fitted to the experimental curves. Comparison is made with other works using particle collection techniques to diagnose laser-produced plasmas.

Keywords

Electron Temperature Probe Surface Flowing Plasma Electron Current Debye Length 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen B. Segall
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied MathematicsUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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