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Dyes for Polyacrylonitrile

  • P. Gregory
Part of the Topics in Applied Chemistry book series (TAPP)

Abstract

Until Perkin’s historic discovery of the first synthetic dye, Mauveine, in 1856, all of the colorants were of natural origin. However, before the end of the nineteenth century, synthetic dyes had displaced virtually all the natural dyes. This was not the case with the textile fibers; the naturally occurring fibers such as cotton, wool, and silk dominated until well into the twentieth century. It was not until the period 1930–1955 that the three major synthetic fibers, namely polyamide (nylon), polyester (e.g., Terylene), and polyacrylonitrile (e.g., Dralon), were discovered and introduced to the market place.

Keywords

Light Fastness Dimethyl Sulfate British Patent Polyacrylonitrile Fiber Sodium Nitrite Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Gregory
    • 1
  1. 1.Fine Chemicals Research CentreICI Colours and Fine ChemicalsBlackley, ManchesterEngland

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