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Kaliomimetic Ion Transport by Injured Membrane During in Vitro Hyperthermia of Tumor Cells

  • J. Robert
  • C. Marchal
  • F. Brunotte
  • L. Anghileri
  • P. Thouvenot

Abstract

Despite the fact that the mechanisms responsible for tumor cell death during hyperthermia are not well known, there is evidence that cell membrane changes related to small temperature variations are the possible cause of the phenomenon. Hyperthermia changes the physical and chemical characteristics of the lipid double layer at the plasma membrane level with consequent modification of permeability to big molecules.1,2 Early changes of cell membrane function may be assessed by means of radiotracers. Smigielski and Janiak3 have demonstrated hyperthermia-induced early damage to the cell membrane by alteration of 86Rb transmembrane transport.

Keywords

Tumor Cell Death Blood Flow Modification Potassium Transport Cell Mortality Radioactivity Uptake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    G. M. Hahn, J. Braun, I. Har-Kedar, Thermochemotherapy: synergism between hyperthermia (42-43 ) and adriamycin (or Bleomycin) in mammalian cell inactivation, Provo Nat. Ac. Sc. USA 72:937 (1975)Google Scholar
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Further Reading

  1. 1.
    J. C. Allen, A. Schwartz, Effects of potassium. Temperature and time on ouabain interaction with the cardiac Na+K+ ATPase: further evidence supporting allosteric site, J. Mal. Cell Cardiol. 1: 39–45 (1970).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. S. Britten, M. Blank, Thallium activation of the (Na+K+). Activated ATPase of rabbit kidney, Biochem. Biophys. Acta 159: 160–166 (1968).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    F. Brunotte, C. Marchal, L. J. Anghileri, J. Robert, Hyperthermia induced tumoral blood flow modifications demonstrated by 201 Thallium and 131 I. Iodoantipyrine, Int. Symposium on Biomedical thermology. Strasbourg, Juillet (1981).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    A. E. Cress, E. W. Gerner, Decreased cholesterol levels in cultured mammalian cells correlates with increased thermal sensitivity. Third Int. Symp on Cancer therapy by hyperthermia drugs and radiation, Fort Collins USA June (1980) (abstract), 17.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    H. S. Dimario, L. Hopwood, M. Kapiszewska, Inhibition of membrane transport by hyperthermia, Third Int. Symp on cancer therapy by hyperthermia. drugs and radiation, Fort Collins USA, June (1980) (abstract) 18.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    E. W. Gerner, A. E. Cress, D. G. Stickney, D. K. Holmes, P. S. Culver, Factors regulating membrane permeability alter thermal resistance, Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 242: 215–233 (1974).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Y. Ito, A. Muranaka, T. Harada, A. Matsudo, T. Yokobayaski, H. Terashima, Experimental study of tumour affinity of 201 Tl-chloride, Eur. J. Nucl. Med. 3: 81–86 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    I. A. Sluskii, V. Manninen, J. Jarnefelt, Factors affecting the relative magnitudes and the ouabain insensitive fluxes of thallium ion in erythrocytes, Biochem. Biophys. Acta 506: 233–241 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Robert
    • 1
  • C. Marchal
    • 1
  • F. Brunotte
    • 1
  • L. Anghileri
    • 1
  • P. Thouvenot
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de BiophysiqueFaculte de MedecineNancyFrance

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