Advertisement

Body Cooling and the Treatment of Heat Stroke

  • K. J. Collins
  • J. C. Easton
  • S. D. Rowlands
  • J. S. Weiner

Abstract

Uncontrolled hyperpyrexia, resulting from an imbalance between excessive heat gain and the inability of the thermoregulatory system to provide an equivalent rate of heat loss from the body, is a serious heat disorder which carries a high mortality.1 Rapid cooling of the core is of utmost priority in treating heat stroke cases. Customarily, emergency treatment involves sponging the patient with cold water, sometimes ice-cold, and exposing the body surface to rapid movement of cool air. A useful degree of cooling, often life-saving, can be obtained by simply plunging the patient into a bath of cold water or applying ice packs.

Keywords

Evaporative Cool Heat Stroke Body Cool Atomize Water Thermoregulatory System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J. S. Weiner, K. J. Collins, Heat stress and heat stroke, in: “Hunter’s Tropical Medicine,” 6th edition. G. T. Strickland ed., Saunders, Philadelphia (1983).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. S. Weiner, M. Khogali, A physiological body-cooling unit for treatment of heat stroke, Lancet 1: 507 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    M. Khogali, J. S. Weiner, Heat stroke: report on 18 cases, Lancet 2: 276 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. C. Collins, K. J. Collins, J. C. Easton, A. J. Hackett, S. D. Rowlands, J. S. Weiner, A bed unit for controlled rapid cooling, J. Physiol. 320: 2 (1981).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. J. Collins
    • 1
  • J. C. Easton
    • 1
  • S. D. Rowlands
    • 1
  • J. S. Weiner
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Research Council (Annexe)LondonUK

Personalised recommendations