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Thermography and Raynaud’s Syndrome

  • M. V. Kyle
  • G. Parr
  • R. Salisbury
  • P. Page Thomas
  • B. L. Hazleman

Abstract

Thermographs display the pattern of heat distribution of the surface under examination. This pattern depends to a large extent on local blood flow. Thermography therefore seems a particularly suitable medium with which to assess vasospastic disorders such as Raynaud’s phenomenon, where symptoms are due to local ischemia. As the condition is episodic, objective assessment is difficult. Cold stress tests (CST) have been used to mimic events when a cold stimulus leads to an attack of Raynaud’s. In conjunction with thermography, such tests provide a useful, non-invasive method of quantifying temperature and heat patterns.

Keywords

Connective Tissue Disease Local Blood Flow Progressive Systemic Sclerosis Digital Ulceration Cold Stimulus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    J. D. Haberman, G. E. Ehrlich, C. Levenson, Thermography in rheumatic diseases, Arch. Phys. Med. and Rehab. 49: 187 - 191 (1968).Google Scholar
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    E. F. J. Ring, A thermographie index for the assessment of ischemia, Acta Thermographica (1981).Google Scholar
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    M. V. Kyle, G. Parr, R. Salisbury, P. Page-Thomas, B. L. Hazleman, PGE1, vasospastic disease and thermography, Presented at Heberden Round, February 1982.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. V. Kyle
    • 1
  • G. Parr
    • 1
  • R. Salisbury
    • 1
  • P. Page Thomas
    • 1
  • B. L. Hazleman
    • 1
  1. 1.Rheumatology Research UnitAddenbrooke’s HospitalCambridgeUK

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