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Thermographic Techniques with Liquid Crystals in Medicine

  • U. Flesch

Abstract

The term liquid crystals consists of two parts which at first sight might appear to be contradictory; crystals consist of fixed elements, atoms and molecules which are fixed in a space lattice whereas elements of fluids are not bound in the same way. However, the spatial distribution of elements is of similar dimensions for both liquids and crystals. On heating, crystals change from the crystalline solid phase into the liquid phase and on cooling from the liquid phase into the crystalline solid phase.

Keywords

Liquid Crystal Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Thermographic Technique Cholesteric Structure Selective Light Reflection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Flesch
    • 1
  1. 1.Rontgendiagnostisches ZentralinstitutRudolf-Virchow-KrankenhausBerlinWest Germany

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