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Molecular Biology, Single Cell Analysis and Quantitative Genetics: New Evolutionary Genetic Approaches in Phytoplankton Ecology

  • A. Michelle Wood
Part of the Lecture Notes on Coastal and Estuarine Studies book series (COASTAL, volume 25)

Abstract

It is widely recognized that phytoplankton in the marine environment experience variation in a range of environmental variables over many temporal and spatial scales (Harris, 1980, 1986; Lewis and Platt, 1982; Ducklow, 1984). Adaptation, has, therefore received considerable attention as a research topic during the last several decades. The conceptual basis for much of this work has emphasized a nongenetic approach to the adaptive process; most examinations of the tolerance of individual phytoplankton species to environmental variation follow the approaches pioneered by Barker (1935), Braarud (1951), and Provasoli and Pintner (1953), in which the response of single clonal representatives of a species to changes in the experimental variable(s) of interest are studied under controlled conditions. From these studies, optimum conditions for growth are inferred and used to interpret patterns of distribution and abundance observed in nature (e.g., Braarud, 1961; Guillard, 1968; Eppley et al., 1969; Titman, 1976; Tilman, 1977; Kilham et al., 1977; Brand and Guillard, 1981; Brand et al., 1983, 1986).

Keywords

Phytoplankton Species Marine Phytoplankton Marine Diatom Phytoplankton Population Thalassiosira Pseudonana 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Michelle Wood
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean SciencesWest Boothbay HarborUSA

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