Men as Destroyers of Marine Life

  • E. J. Ferguson Wood

Abstract

Man is horrified by the thought of a nuclear war, but careless of the fact that he is at war with nature. The Australian aborigines, men of the stone age until very recently, were never a threat to the environment, because their population, prior to the coming of the white man, was controlled by nature at a level of possibly 500,000 in a continent of about 3 million square miles. Other stone age populations in other parts of the world were similarly controlled, and this, coupled with environment control of other predators, kept a balanced ecology. The change came when man started to husband his resources, to cultivate the land, fell the forests and dam the rivers and streams. Not only did he create an artificial environment, but he also found that he had the power to divert nature and interfere with natural phenomena. From then on he became increasingly destructive, and can now easily turn the whole earth into a desert. He already has done so in the Middle East, in the Sahara, and in parts of Australia.

Keywords

Methane Toxicity Phosphorus Sulphide Mercury 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Johannes, R.E. ‘Uptake and Release of dissolved organic Phosphorus by representatives of a coastal marine ecosystem. Limn. Oceanogr. 9: 235–242.Google Scholar
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    Smith, J.E. (Ed.). 1968. ’Torrey Canyon’ Pollution and Marine Life Cambridge, at the University Press.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Scheuring, D. L. 1936. `Die Reinigung and Verwertung der Abwasser von München.’ Natur und Volk 69: 390.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Nair, K. K. 1944. Calcutta Sewage Irrigation Fisheries. Proc. Nat. Inst. Sci. India. 10: 459–462.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© E. J. Ferguson Wood 1975

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  • E. J. Ferguson Wood

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