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Application of Multilayer Analyzers to 15–150 Å Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Chemical and Valence Band Analysis

  • Burton L. Henke

Abstract

Methods and instruments have been developed for efficient spectroscopic analysis in the 15 to 150 Å ultrasoft X-ray region using specially designed Langmuir—Blodgett type multilayer analyzers with a flow proportional counter detection system. Simple adaptations of the basic Philips vacuum spectrograph are employed with a high-intensity, demountable, ultrasoft X-ray source to excite fluorescence in the lighter elements for chemical and valence band analysis.

Keywords

Boron Nitride Light Element Sodium Chlorite Sodium Chlorate Pomona College 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • Burton L. Henke
    • 1
  1. 1.Pomona CollegeClaremontUSA

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