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The Effect of Chemical Combination on Some Soft X-ray K and L Emission Spectra

  • David W. Fischer
  • William L. Baun

Abstract

X-ray spectrochemical analysis is a versatile technique that can be used to determine considerably more than just the elemental composition of a sample. X-ray lines and bands are, in many cases, influenced by the state of chemical combination of the element whose spectrum is being investigated. Significant effects due to changes in bonding are seen in the K and L spectra of the low atomic number elements which fall in the 20 to 90 Å region. Results using primary excitation, a stearate crystal, and a flow proportional counter are shown for the K spectra of boron, carbon, and nitrogen. Chlorine and sulfur L spectra from some simple metal compounds of these elements are also shown.

Keywords

Main Band Chemical Combination Soap Film Band Shape Extra Band 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1966

Authors and Affiliations

  • David W. Fischer
    • 1
  • William L. Baun
    • 1
  1. 1.Air Force Materials LaboratoryWright-Patterson Air Force BaseUSA

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