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Analysis of Hydrogen Permeation Experiments in 403 Stainless Steel

  • Barbara Okray Hall
  • Richard J. Jacko
  • James A. Begley
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 6)

Abstract

A series of room temperature hydrogen permeation experiments was performed with AISI Type 403 martensitic stainless steel. Permeation transients were measured for specimens electrochemically charged in an 8.0 M NaOH solution under constant current (galvano-static) conditions. Results were compared with a model that describes time-dependent diffusion of hydrogen in a material containing saturable and nonsaturable hydrogen trapping sites. At low charging currents, the microstructural traps are reversible and saturable and values for the trapping parameters, specifically trap density and binding energy, were obtained by fitting to model calculations. At high charging currents, nonsaturable traps appear to be present, indicative of either surface damage induced by the charging current or changing surface conditions.

Keywords

Effective Diffusion Coefficient Trap Density Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI Type Trapping Parameter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Okray Hall
    • 1
  • Richard J. Jacko
    • 1
  • James A. Begley
    • 1
  1. 1.Westinghouse Research and Development CenterPittsburghUSA

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