Physical Constitution of Planets and Satellites

  • Albrecht Unsöld
Part of the Heidelberg Science Library book series (HSL)


In recent decades the study of planets and satellites has developed into one of the most difficult chapters in astrophysics. We can leave the discussion of the necessary instruments to Chapter 9. At the present time, the interpretation of the observations demands all the resources of physical chemistry (chemical equilibrium, phase-diagrams, and so on). Also the formation and evolution of our planetary system (cosmogony) can be usefully discussed only in the context of the evolution of the stars and of the Galaxy.


Lunar Surface Physical Constitution Terrestrial Planet Planetary Atmosphere Continental Drift 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albrecht Unsöld
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Theoretical Physics and University ObservatoryKielGermany

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