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Developing Settlements for People

  • Ralph R. Widner
Part of the Urban Innovation Abroad book series (UIA)

Abstract

Over the next two decades, the world’s population is expected to grow by 1,880 million. Of this increase, slightly more than 1,700 million is projected for the developing countries. The increase of population in these less developed nations over the next two decades is likely to exceed the total projected population in the more developed countries in the year 2000 by about 430 million[1]. (See Table 1).

Keywords

Local Authority Human Settlement Rural Settlement Urban Settlement Guest Worker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph R. Widner

There are no affiliations available

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