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Problems in the Management of Patients with Infantile Hypothyroidism

  • Marvin L. Mitchell
  • Rosalie J. Hermos
  • Deborah L. Frederick
  • Robert Z. Klein
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 161)

Abstract

There is general agreement that treatment of hypothyroid infants diagnosed by screening has proved to be remarkably effective in preventing the intellectual deficit commonly seen in infantile hypothyroidism of an earlier era. However, not all programs have experienced the same degree of success with respect to neuropsychological outcome among their patients. Both the Toronto and Quebec investigators have reported that children with delayed skeletal maturation had lower global IQ scores than those of the children with normal bone maturation at birth.1, 2

Keywords

Congenital Hypothyroidism Free Thyroid Hormone Intellectual Deficit Jamaica Plain Hypothyroid Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marvin L. Mitchell
    • 1
  • Rosalie J. Hermos
    • 1
  • Deborah L. Frederick
    • 1
  • Robert Z. Klein
    • 1
  1. 1.New England Regional Screening ProgramState Laboratory InstituteJamaica PlainUSA

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