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Vehicular Emissions and Control

  • Ernest S. Starkman

Abstract

Internal Combustion Engines, now, and for the immediate future, constitute the principal and preponderant contributors to atmospheric pollution. Battery powered or direct energy conversion vehicles may become an entity at some future date. However, for at least a decade, limitations in their application will preclude any significant replacement of combustion engines for vehicular propulsion.

Keywords

Nitric Oxide Diesel Engine Gasoline Engine Vehicular Emission Spark Ignition Engine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ernest S. Starkman
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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