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Detection and Analysis of Atmospheric Pollutants

  • Peter K. Mueller

Abstract

There are several objectives for air quality measurements and each presents a unique set of requirements to be considered in the selection of sampling sites, sampling frequencies and methods of analysis. Firm concepts about rational approaches are still being developed (76, Morgan, Saltsmann, Percy and Hildebrandt, Bell, McGuire and Noll, and Whitby, Proceedings 11th Methods Conference*), but these authors have already presented useful guidelines.

Keywords

Methyl Orange Atmospheric Pollutant Nitrogen Dioxide None None Industrial Hygiene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter K. Mueller
    • 1
  1. 1.Air and Industrial Hygiene LaboratoryState Department of Public HealthBerkeleyUSA

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