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Central Power Plants

  • Robert F. Sawyer

Abstract

Central power plants have the dubious distinction of being third in their contribution to air pollution in the United States, trailing motor vehicles and industry. Power plants emit approximately 25% of the particulates, 46% of the oxides of sulfur, and 25% of the oxides of nitrogen which are released each year into the atmosphere in the United States. They are minor contributors of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons.

Keywords

Nitric Oxide Sulfur Dioxide Electric Utility Vanadium Pent Oxide Sulfur Trioxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Federal Power Commission Staff Report, “Air Pollution and the Regulated Electric Power and Natural Gas Industries,” Washington, D. C., September 1968.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cuffe, S. T. and Gerstle, R. W., “Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants: a Comprehensive Summary,” U. S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, PHS Publication No. 999-AP35, 1967.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Danielson, R. A. (Editor), “Air Pollution Engineering Manual,” U. S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, PHS Publication No. 999-AP-40, 1967.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Duprey, R. L., “Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Factors,” U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, PHS Publication No. 999-AP-42, 1968.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bartok, W., et al, “Systems Study of Nitrogen Oxide Control Methods for Stationary Sources,” Esso Research and Engineering Company, Interim Status Report, Contract No. PH–22–68–55, May, 1, 1969.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. Sawyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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