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Model of Causality in Social Learning Theory

  • Albert Bandura

Abstract

Many theories have been proposed over the years to explain human behavior. The basic conceptions of human nature they adopt and the causal processes they postulate require careful examination for several reasons. What theorists believe people to be determines which aspects of human functioning they explore most thoroughly and which they leave unexamined. Conceptions of human nature thus focus inquiry on selected processes and are in turn strengthened by findings of paradigms embodying the particular view. For example, theorists who exclude the capacity for self-direction from their view of human potentialities confine their research to external sources of influence and indeed find that behavior is often influenced by extrinsic outcomes. Theorists who view humans as possessing self-directing capabilities employ paradigms that shed light on how people make causal contribution to their own motivation and action through the exercise of self-influence.

Keywords

Human Nature Social Learning Social Learn Theory Observational Learning Chance Encounter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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  79. von Cranach, M., Foppa, K., Lepenies, W., & Ploog, D. (Eds.). Human ethology: Claims and limits of a new discipline. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1979.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert Bandura
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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