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Psychotherapy and Human Change Processes

  • Michael J. Mahoney

Abstract

The patterns and parameters of human change processes remain one of the oldest and most intriguing themes of thoughtful inquiry. Our libraries are filled with an inseparable mixture of fictional and nonfictional expressions and analyses of change and stability in human lives. And throughout these writings are pervasive assumptions about human nature, epistemology, and certain tacit universals of experience and existence (Durant & Durant, 1970; Foucault, 1970; Friedman, 1967, 1974; Polanyi, 1966; Russell, 1945). The persistence of our quest for knowledge—and especially knowledge about ourselves—is probably a reflection of formidable inclinations toward both meaning and power. Francis Bacon observed that “knowledge is power.” The nature of that power was stated more explicitly in the ancient Chinese volume, the I Ching or Book of Changes (Wilhelm & Baynes, 1950, p. 243):

If we know the laws of change, we can precalculate in regard to it, and freedom of action thereupon becomes possible.

Keywords

American Psychologist Motor Theory Dissipative Structure Personal Change Personal Meaning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Mahoney
    • 1
  1. 1.Counseling PsychologyUniversity of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA

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