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Thin-Layer Chromatography Radioassay: A Review

  • Fred Snyder

Abstract

Considerable technological progress has been made in the radioassay of analytical and preparative thin-layer chroma­tography (TLC) plates since Mangold’s original review of this subject (a chapter in Stahl’s book, Dunnschicht-Chromatog­raphic, 62–79, 1962). Although the general approach to radioassay of thin-layer chromatograms is similar to that used in paper chromatography, the two techniques require different radiometric procedures because the physical and chemical nature of the materials used in adsorption TLC are completely different from those encountered in partition separations by paper.

Autoradiography, fluorography, strip scanning, zonal scan­ning, and elution procedures are used for radiometric analysis of thin-layer chromatograms. Thin-layer chromatographic profiles of C14 and H3 determined by liquid scintillation zonal scans are superior to other methods in sensitivity and resolu­tion. Recently the entire zonal-scan procedure was com­puterized so that the distribution of the chemical mass or radioactivity along a chromatographic lane can be graphed by an electroplotter directed by the TLC computer program. The program gives a direct printout of area percent, recovery, and counting efficiency.

Corroborative TLC (argentation and borate) and gas—liquid chromatography techniques are described for the separation of glyceryl alkyl ethers according to unsaturation, isomeric form, and chain length.

Keywords

Photographic Emulsion Adsorbent Layer Label Compound Glyceryl Ether Organic Scintillator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© New England Nuclear Corporation 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred Snyder
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Division Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear StudiesOak Ridge Associated UniversitiesOak RidgeUSA

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