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Marihuana vs. Alcohol: A Pharmacologic Comparison

  • Edward B. TruittJr.
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 56)

Abstract

There has been much popular debate between marihuana and alcohol as to which of these two leading drugs for social and recreational use is most satisfactory or least harmful. In arguing this issue, the proponents of each have used and misused pharmacologic facts as well as innuendo, exaggeration and unproven allegations to bolster their own case. While part of this confusion derives deliberately from culturally based needs to defend one’s own point of view, there is a paucity of carefully designed and controlled experimental data and scientific debate upon which to base such an argument. While no value judgment about which is best could be achieved by a scientific comparison between these two drugs it might contribute toward greater objectivity in future discussions.

Keywords

Lateral Hypothalamus Brain Serotonin Simulated Driving Delirium Tremens Lysergic Acid Diethylamide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward B. TruittJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.The George WashingtonUniversity School of MedicineUSA

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