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An Overview of Condensed Tannin Structure

  • Peter E. Laks

Abstract

The proanthocyanidins are an important class of natural products forming the basis for various classes of flavonoid polymers such as the condensed tannins, phlobaphenes, and phenolic acids. Refining our understanding of the structure of polyflavonoids will lead to a better appreciation of their properties and help in developing their use as a renewable source of commodity and specialty chemicals. Considerable progress has already been made in the last two decades, but more information is needed on structural elaborations during, and particularly after, their biosynthesis. Armed with further information on the structure of polyflavonoids, we should be able to understand better their interactions with other biopolymers and hence their biological significance.

Keywords

Natural Product Condensed Tannin Wood Preservative Specialty Chemical Decay Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter E. Laks
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Wood ResearchMichigan Technological UniversityHoughtonUSA

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