Advertisement

Tannins as Specialty Chemicals: An Overview

  • Paul R. Steiner

Abstract

Apart from their traditional use for leather manufacture and more recent applications as wood adhesives, tannins have seen limited success as specialty chemicals. Previous attempts to develop tannin-based chemicals have suffered because of our failure to appreciate fully economic requirements, purity and stability factors, and application needs of industrial processes. This chapter presents an overview of some of the chemical, physical, and structural features of tannins that have a bearing on future specialty chemical development. Information also is provided on areas where tannins have recently been utilized.

Keywords

Oriented Strand Board Specialty Chemical Wood Adhesive Tannin Extract Extract Quality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Chow, S. Some physical properties of bark related to utilization. Western Forest Products Lab Report (Forintek Canada), Canadian Forestry Service, Vancouver, B.C. 22 p. (1976).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Porter, L.J.; Hemingway, R.W. Significance of condensed tannins. In: Rowe, J.W. (ed.) Natural Products Extraneous to the Lignocellulosic Cell Wall of Woody Plants, Springer-Verlag (in press).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Pizzi, A. Tannin-based wood adhesives. In: Pizzi, A. (ed.) Wood Adhesives; Chemistry and Technology, Marcel Dekker Inc., New York, pp. 177–246 (1983).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Herrick, F.W. Chemistry and utilization of hemlock bark extractives. Agric. Food Chem. 28: 228 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Sears, K.D.; Casebier, R.L.; Hergert, H.L.; Stodt, G.M.; McCandish, L.E. The structure of catechinic acid, a base rearrangement product of catechin. J. Org. Chem. 39: 3244 (1975).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Hemingway, R.W.; Kreibich, R.E.; McGraw, G.W.; Ohara, S. Modifying phenolic adhesives with condensed tannins. In: Structural Wood Composites: New Technologies for Expanded Markets. FPRS Proceedings 47359, Memphis, Tennessee. pp. 88–92, (1988).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hillis, W.E. Natural polyphenols (tannins) as a basis for adhesives. In: Phenolic Resins - Chemistry and Applications. Weyerhaeuser Science Symposium Proceedings 2, Tacoma, Washington, pp. 171–188 June (1979).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Pizzi, A. Research vs. industrial practice with tannin-based adhesives. In: Hemingway, R.W.; Conner, A.H.; Branham, S.J. (eds) Adhesives from Renewable Resources. ACS Symposium Series No. 385., American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, pp. 254–270 (1989).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kreibich, R.E.; Hemingway, R.W., Tannin-based adhesives for finger-jointing wood. In: Hemingway, R.W., Conner, A.H. Branham, S.J. (eds.) Adhesives from Renewable Resources. ACS Symposium Series No. 385., American Chemical Society, Washington DC, pp. 203–216 (1989).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hamed, G.R.; Chung, K.H.; Hemingway, R.W. Condensed tannins as substitutes for resorcinol in bonding polyester and nylon cord to rubber. In: Hemingway, R.W.; Conner, A.H.; Branham, S.J. (eds.) Adhesives from Renewable Resources. ACS Symposium Series No. 385., American Chemical Society, Washington DC, pp. 242–253 (1989).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Dix, B., Marutzky, R., Modification of diisocyanate-based particleboard and plywood glues with natural polymers; polyphenols, carbohydrates, and proteins. In: Hemingway, R.W.; Conner, A.H., Branham, S.J. (eds.) Adhesives from Renewable Resources. ACS Symposium Series No. 385, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC., pp. 229–241, (1989).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul R. Steiner
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of ForestryUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

Personalised recommendations