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Aerosols from Exploding Wires

  • F. G. Karioris
  • B. R. Fish
  • G. W. RoysterJr.

Abstract

A large fraction of an exploded wire can be recovered reproducibly from the solid aerosol disperse phase produced by explosions at various voltages (1 to 18 kv) on a 20-µf capacitor bank. Typical smokes consisting of oxide particles are produced by explosions of base metals in air and fine metallic particles are produced by the explosion of Ag, Au, and Pt in air or by A1 and Cu exploded in argon. Primary particle size and size distribution are related to the voltage used for explosion. Aerosol yield curves for copper and uranium are discussed in the light of previously described exploding wire phenomena. The method is well suited for the production of small quantities of solid aerosols.

Keywords

Yield Curve Capacitor Bank Primary Particle Size Uranium Oxide Wire Explosion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press New York 1962

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. G. Karioris
    • 1
  • B. R. Fish
    • 2
  • G. W. RoysterJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.Marquette UniversityMilwaukeeUSA
  2. 2.Health Physics DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

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