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Exploding Foils — The Production of Plane Shock Waves and the Acceleration of Thin Plates

  • D. V. Keller
  • J. R. PenningJr.

Abstract

The electrical explosion of thin metal foils has been used to induce shock waves in solids. The foil is either placed in direct contact with the solid, or is used to accelerate a thin-plate projectile to high velocity before it strikes a target. Pressures up to 10 kilobars are readily obtainable with the direct- contact method. Using the second method, we have accelerated 2-in. Mylar plates to over 0.4 cm/µsec resulting in pressures over 80 kilobars. The deviation from planarity of the shock waves produced by the two methods is approximately the same and is due to a slight nonsimultaneity in the foil explosion. Typically, a 2 in. square thin aluminum foil explodes simultaneously over its area within about 10−7 sec. This excellent simultaneity permits the acceleration of very thin projectile plates, with resultant short-duration pulses. We have used 5-mil Mylar projectiles which produced 80-kilobar pulses with durations of only about 0.1 / µ sec. The dependence of the pressures and velocities obtained upon the circuit and foil-load assembly parameters will be discussed.

Keywords

Shock Wave Pressure Pulse Energy Storage System Energy Transfer Efficiency Streak Camera 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    G.W. Anderson and F. W. Neilson, in “Exploding Wires,” Vol. 1, W.G. Chace and H. K. Moore [eds.], Plenum Press, New York, 1959, p. 97.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press New York 1962

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. V. Keller
    • 1
  • J. R. PenningJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.The Boeing CompanySeattleUSA

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